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Yellowstone

History

Mammoth
Hot Springs

Fires of 1988

Madison River

Lower Falls of
the Yellowstone

Upper Falls of
the Yellowstone

Geysers

Grizzly &
Wolf Discovery
Center



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Contact Me

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park was the first National park, set aside for Federal protection in 1872 by Ulysses S. Grant. The park is located in the northwest corner of Wyoming and spills into southeastern Idaho and southwestern Montana. Encompassing 2.2 million acres, it is larger than Road Island and Deleware combined. The park sees approximately 3 million visitor per year with most of these between May and September. Additional statistics for the park can be found here.

Geysers
Geyser Basin
North Entrance to Yellowstone
Roosevelt Arch
South Entrance to Yellowstone
South Entrance
Lewis Canyon
Lewis Canyon
Elk
Rocky Mountain Elk
Valley View
Valley View
Yellowstone Lodge
Old Faithful Lodge
Bison
Bison
Mountain Goat
Mountain Goat
Lewis Lake
Lewis Lake
Gallatin Sunset

Gallatin Valley Sunset

Lower Falls with Red Rock in Foreground
Lower Falls of the Yellowstone
Gibbon Falls
Gibbon Falls
Pelican
Male Pelican
Elk & Bison
Elk & Bison
Tundra Swan
Tundra Swan

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Mammoth Hot Springs

Mammoth Hotsprings 3
View towards Mammoth
Hot Springs
Mammoth Hotsprings
Cascading deposits
Mammoth Hotsprings
Mineral-rich pools
Mammoth Hotsprings 4
Overlooking Mammoth Hot Springs

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The Fires of 1988

On July 22nd, 1988, a woodcutter carelessly (some say purposefully) dropped a lit cigarette in the Targhee National Forest, some 200 yards outside the souther border of Yellowstone National Park. By the next day, the fire had grown to 500 acres and would quickly worsen. Modern estimates vary from just under 800,000 acres to nearly 1,000,000 acres burned during the fires of 1988. Whatever the final tally, it has left deep scars that are still visible throughout the park.

Burned Tree
Burns from 1988
Burned Trees
Burnout from 1988
Fire Fighter
Park Service
Fire Worker
Fire
Rebirth after the fires

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Madison River

Fly Fishing
Fly Fishing in the Madison
West of the Park
Madison River
Madison River

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The Lower Falls of the Yellowstone

The upper and lower falls of the Yellowstone are both spectacular in their own rights. The Lower Falls, at 309 feet, are higher than Niagara Falls (a mere 182 feet). The photo below shows the view of the falls with the wooden walkway to Red Rock in the foreground. The 1-mile walk down the Red Rock path begins at the Lookout Point parking lot and twists and turns down the precarious path finally flattening into a nicely built wooden pathway that ends at an observation point that is breathtaking. Ospreys gliding gracefully across the sky combined with the sapphire blue color of the sky will reaffirm your desire to return to Yellowstone again.

Lower Falls 2
Lower Falls of the Yellowstone
through the trees
Lower Falls
Lower Falls of the Yellowstone
Lower Falls with Red Rock
Lower Falls with Red Rock
in Foreground
Yellowstone River
Yellowstone River above
Lower Falls
Angie at Lower Falls
Angie at Lower Falls
Lone Pine
Lone Ponderosa Pine


Upper Falls
Upper Falls of the
Yellowstone

The Upper Falls of the Yellowstone

The Upper Falls of the Yellowstone sees far fewer vistior and offers a more direct view of their impressive power. The South Rim trail allows visitors easy access to the falls with hardly any effort. The powerful roar of the falls is clearly heard behind screens of trees and undergrowth. A truly impressive display of nature's continual power is reward for the effort. A path leading upstream from the falls offers deceivingly placid views of the Yellowstone River prior to its descent over the falls.

This scene is of the Yellowstone River just above the Upper Falls, the bridge in the background leads to a parking lot at the brink of the falls. The river rushes silently past the bank but the sound of the falls is a constant reminder of the danger of falling into the current. The hike is very pleasant and relatively easy. The trail connects into the road leading back to the Upper Falls parking lot. There isn't a lot of walking room next to the road so caution is required if making this trek.


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Geysers

One of the biggest attractions in Yellowstone is the geysers. Although I appreciate the geologic significance of having the world's largest concentration of thermal activity, eventually the smell of sulpher and the interval between eruptions leaves me feeling a bit apathetic and a little nauseous. I have include a couple of geyser photographs even though I did not spend a significant amount of time setting up or photographing them.

Old Faithful
Old Faithful
Old Faithful 2
Old Faithful
Geyser
Geyser
Mud Pot
Mud Pot
Castle Geyser
Castle Geyser
Geyser Pools
Geyser Pools
Steaming Geyser
Steaming Geyser
Green Ooze
Green Ooze

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Yellowstone National Park and
The Grizzly Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone

June 16th, 2005

The Grizzly and Wolf Discovery Center in West Yellowstone, Montana is a great place to see and learn about these amazing animals. The wolves were in the facility were all unplanned pups from another facility and were adopted by the facility. The bears were rescued from Montana, Alaska, and Canada and are rotated throughout the week.

Wolf
Naya - Beta Male
Wolf 2
Granite - Beta Male
Wolf 3
Wolf Nap
Wolf 4
Sleeping Wolf
Bears
Playing Bears
Bears 2
Bear playing with Elk hide
Bears 3
Revel - Among the Rocks

Bears 4
Revel - Resting

 

Bears 5
Kobuk - Profile
Bears 6
Revel and Kobuk
Bears 7
Nakina - Sitting
Bears 8
Revel - in a hole

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Last Update: July 8, 2006


Copyright © Rich Adams 2005
All Rights Reserved